Wort Thief Chiller
  • Wort Thief Chiller

Wort Thief Chiller

SKU SPTHIEF-CHILL

No more messing around with ice baths to cool your wort.  The Wort Thief Chiller is a great way to efficiently cool your wort sample from boiling (after you pull it from the brew kettle) to (or near) 60F.  


This premier 304 stainless steel Wort Thief Chiller, used to cool your wort down so that you can take specific gravity/Plato readings, features:

  • Approximately 11 oz. Sample Size
  • 1/4" NPT Cold Water inlet (on bottom)
  • Hose Barb Hot Water outlet (near the top)
  • 1.25" OD Sample Tube x 19.75" Long
  • 2" Diameter x 21" Long (large tube)
  • Legs for mounting

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SPTHIEF-CHILL (2525)

Price: $157.49
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  • Approximately 11 oz. Sample Size
  • 1/4" NPT Cold Water inlet (on bottom)
  • Hose Barb Hot Water outlet (near the top)
  • 1.25" OD Sample Tube x 19.75" Long
  • 2" Diameter x 21" Long (large tube)
  • Legs for mounting

How to Use this Wort Thief Chiller:

  1. Connect the bottom 1/4" NPT fitting to your cold water supply with a ball valve. 
  2. Connect the upper hose barb to a hose that directs the used water to your drain. 
  3. Fill the sample tube with boiling wort and let the cold water flow. 
  4. The cold water flows up past the sample tube and cools the wort down so you can then measure the specific gravity with maximum accuracy

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Customer Reviews

  • Author: Jer
    I bought this on a bit of a whim to help satisfy my ongoing obsession with stainless steel bits, and found this past weekend that it is very, very useful. I have it plumbed into the same manifold that feeds cold tap water to our counter-flow-chillers. The Thief will take a full tube of wort from boil to 60-70degF (for accurate SG measurements) in 90 seconds.

    It's very solid, and it's a lot more useful than I anticipated. Considering that a good refractometer is anywhere from 60-120$, and is a compromise, I put in a vote for this thing....

    -J.